• Akinsanya Kambon (American, born 1946), John Randall, Buffalo Soldier, n.d. Raku-fired clay, 15 1/2 x 4 x 9 1/2 in. Crocker Art Museum, long-term loan from S. Tama-sha Ross Kambon and Akinsanya D. Kambon aka Mark Teemer.
    American Expressions/African Roots
    Akinsanya Kambon’s Ceramic Sculpture
    February 02, 2020 — February 28, 2021
Akinsanya Kambon, Contradictions. 2016. Raku - fired clay, approx. 50 1/2 x 28 1/2 in. Collection of S. Tama - sha Ross Kambon and Akinsanya D. Kambon aka Mark Teemer.
Akinsanya Kambon, Nehanda. 2013. Raku - fired clay, approx. 18 1/2 x 9 in. Collection of S. Tama - sha Ross Kambon and Akinsanya D. Kambon aka Mark Teemer
Akinsanya Kambon, Equestrian Black Sampson. 2012. Raku-fired clay, 16 1/2 x 5 1/4 x 10 in. Crocker Art Museum, gift of S. Tama-sha Ross Kambon and Akinsanya D. Kambon aka Mark Teemer, 2018.5.

Born as Mark Teemer in Sacramento, Akinsanya Kambon is a former Marine, Black Panther, and art professor. Stricken with polio as a child, he turned to drawing for comfort, and ultimately his therapy. He recalls in his adolescence frequent visits to the Crocker Art Museum, which fascinated him and showed him the human potential in creating art. He served a tour of duty in Vietnam with the United States Marine Corps from 1966–1968. Shortly thereafter, he created The Black Panther Coloring Book to bring attention to racial inequality and social injustice. Despite being only semi-literate in his youth, Kambon went on to earn his Master of Arts from California State University, Fresno. In more recent years, he was featured in Wartorn: 1861–2010, an HBO documentary screened at the Pentagon on post-traumatic stress disorder in veterans.

Today, Kambon’s work is as rich and varied as his personal history, expressed through drawings, paintings, bronze sculptures, and ceramics. This exhibition focuses specifically on the artist’s clay sculptures, which are fired using the Western-style raku technique — a challenging, dangerous, and unpredictable process that creates prismatic and iridescent glaze finishes. He performs kiln firings in a ceremonial manner, breathing life into ceramic figures that typically represent African deities and spirits and, sometimes, American history and religious subjects. Drawing heavily on narrative tradition and personal experiences, including extensive travels throughout Africa, Kambon’s work celebrates perseverance through hardship, cultural pride, and his gift as a storyteller. Click HERE to learn more.

Exhibition sponsored in part by Jeffrey Spahn Gallery.

ArtInteractive LIVE! Art and Technology

Venture behind the scenes of the Museum and Sacramento’s art scene with ArtInteractive LIVE! This immersive, digital program is part variety show, part family game night, part revealing art discussion forum.

Members register today

Monster Mash

Costumed kiddos and their grownups are invited to a participatory performance full of amazement and artistic inspiration! Following the performance, explore the galleries with a Halloween-inspired scavenger hunt, take a festive family portrait, and discover a magical surprise or two.

Register today

The Museum Store is Now Online!

Shop select exhibitions, show your Crocker pride with themed swag, or stock up on art supplies! All proceeds support the Crocker's educational programs.

Shop Now