Pots: Heaped Black Ollas in the Oaxaca Market, 1926.
Edward Henry Weston (American, 1886–1958)
Gelatin silver print, 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. Crocker Art Museum, gift of Hardie C. Setzer, 1986.5.21.

Arguably the 20th century’s most influential photographer, Edward Weston produced iconic images of landscapes, people, buildings, and small objects like shells, and peppers. Born in Highland Park, Ill., he discovered photography in his youth and began his professional career in Southern California in the early 1900s as a surveyor for the railroads. After a brief period of study at the Illinois College of Photography, he returned to Southern California in 1908.

Early in his career, he worked in a soft-focus, Pictorialist style and became a founding member of the Camera Pictorialists of Los Angeles. He married the next year and opened his own studio in 1911, supporting his artistic efforts through commercial photography. In the early 1920s, Weston developed a reductive, sharply focused aesthetic. He pursued this new approach during a three-year sojourn in Mexico in the mid-1920s, producing images such as Pots: Heaped Black Ollas in the Oaxaca Market.

Traveling in the company of actress and photographer Tina Modotti, he produced images of her, as well as portraits of other notable artists and writers. He continued making portraits throughout his career. In Mexico, Weston also began to focus on close-up studies of nature, investigating subjects such as vegetables, shells, trees, rocks, and clouds. In Carmel, where he lived from 1929 to 1935, he added coastal subjects to his repertoire. He also began a series of nudes. The latter most often depicted Charis Wilson, whom he met in 1934. He married her three years later.

Back to Collection
Next Previous

The Official Rogue Book Club

For Mental Health Month, we are taking on ​"Marbles" ​by cartoonist Ellen Forney, which explores the relationship between “crazy” and “creative.”

Sign Up

Icons in Conversation: Alison Saar

Known for her powerful sculptures and prints that illuminate narratives of the African Diaspora, Saar’s work is featured in collections across the world.

Learn More

The Museum Store is Now Online!

Shop select exhibitions, show your Crocker pride with themed swag, or stock up on art supplies! All proceeds support the Crocker's educational programs.

Shop Now